Art Therapy: So You Think You Can’t Draw

Perhaps by sharing my talented friend, Carrie’s, art work in my recent post about art therapy, I have unintentionally given you the idea that you need to be an artist to do this.  While it is true that Carrie is a talented artist (you should see her other work), it is not necessary to be an artist to use art therapy effectively.

I’m willing to put my own art on the line to make my point.  So brace your self…

My results from the Visual Journaling book
My results from the Visual Journaling book

This is one of my drawings using the method described in the book Visual Journaling by Ganim and Fox.  My notes about this picture say only:  Pondering the source of joint pain.  Drowning in sorrow-surrounded by pain and anger both from within and without.

Snapshot_20130628This picture from my journal has no caption only the date, but looking at it I can tell I was trying to work through some anger and pain.  After all what do you do with the anger and pain of so long ago?

Everyone says, “let it go.”  I’m trying!

As you can see by these pictures, the purpose of art therapy is not to create master-pieces, but to help one work through feelings, sometimes very intense feelings.  I know my pictures look childish, reasonably so since they depict childhood pain.  But I’m okay with that because they are an outlet that keeps me from self-harm.  I’m not tempted to self-harm any more, but at one time the desire was very intense.

Besides giving one insight into themselves as Carrie’s pictures and descriptions show so well, or allowing one to release emotions, art can also help one relax.

I enjoy drawing and doodling, though I have never thought of myself as an artist by any means.  (If my artwork about hasn’t convinced you I don’t know what will.)    So when I stumbled upon Zentangle, I was intrigued.  Snapshot_20130628_6First, I looked at a couple websites on line, and then at a couple youtube videos.  Then, off to the library (website) to find some Zentangle books.  Not surprisingly they were all checked out, but I put a few on hold.   While I was waiting, I created this–with my on-line instruction–Sorry it’s not a very good photograph, but the picture is pretty rudimentary anyway.

Then I received my first Zentangle book from the library, this is one I must buy my own copy of: One Zentangle a Day: A 6-week Course In Creative Drawing for Relaxation, Inspiration and Fun by Beckah Krahula.

Snapshot_20130628_7

With her wonderful instructions, I started to “get” it.  I have to warn you here–it’s only right that I do–tangling is addictive.  I can’t seem to stop.  It really is relaxing, inspiring and fun.  I can’t get enough of it.

One day I showed my pictures to a friend, previously I had never let anyone but my therapist see my “art”.  The friend, who happened to be an art teacher was very generous with her praise, so I let other people see it.  Before I knew it people were saying to me, “I didn’t know you were an artist.”

Believe me, I didn’t either.  Actually, I still don’t think of myself as an artist, but simply an art yogi.  I’m kidding.

Snapshot_20130628_8

What I want to say to you is this:

If you have any desire at all, to try art therapy, then do it!  Don’t worry if your creations look childish–those seem to be the most therapeutic anyway.  Who knows, you might just find a new addiction–err–hobby, as I have.

_______

The Official Zentangle website is: http://www.zentangle.com/

The Zentagle Youtube page: http://www.youtube.com/user/Zentangle?feature=watch

And here is a sample:

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3 thoughts on “Art Therapy: So You Think You Can’t Draw

  1. Pushing physical toxics from our inside to our outside, an action that we do several times a day as designed by Heavenly Father (toxic air, water, and solids) is the model for mental and spiritual life. Like seeing our spirit selves and eliminating spiritual toxicity on Sunday mornings I can see that these drawings give you a detailed look at what you are thinking. I am glad that the work which you have done has kept you safe, Leslie.

  2. Leslie,
    Happy 4th. We dont just let go of any of our emotions. They are “trapped,” in our bodies and the thought police cant change that.
    Great art my friend. Taking the day off from the blog world but wanted to say hello to you.
    Jim

  3. Amazing! I may agree that our emotions never leave us, but our feelings about those emotions can change. Through different forms of therapy, the ‘sting’ of the emotions can leave us. Your art therapy certainly has me excited to try it, especially the Zentangle. It’s beautiful!

    You are indeed an artist, through word and picture.

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